Intel limited the Overclocking - 11600K & 11900K OC
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Intel limited the Overclocking – 11600K & 11900K OC

Intel limited the Overclocking – 11600K & 11900K OC

 

With intel’s previous generation of CPUs you could get a 5.1 to 5.2gigahertz overclock with not much effort at all in fact I even managed 5.3 on one of my 10900k samples as did many other reviewers but with the new 11th gen CPUs overclocking has surprisingly taken a couple of steps back which is really odd for a newer generation of CPU you don’t expect it to be clocked slower than the old ones so today we’re going to take a look at what you can expect.

 

Intel limited the Overclocking – 11600K & 11900K OC Intel limited the Overclocking – 11600K & 11900K OC Intel limited the Overclocking – 11600K & 11900K OC Intel limited the Overclocking – 11600K & 11900K OC Intel limited the Overclocking – 11600K & 11900K OC

Intel limited the Overclocking - 11600K & 11900K OC

Intel limited the Overclocking – 11600K & 11900K OC

Intel limited the Overclocking – 11600K & 11900K OC Intel limited the Overclocking – 11600K & 11900K OC Intel limited the Overclocking – 11600K & 11900K OC Intel limited the Overclocking – 11600K & 11900K OC

When overclocking the 11600k and 11900k and what this means in terms of performance thermals and power so there’s no denying that intel’s overclocking has always been superior to what amd’s ryzen has to offer and in most cases you could comfortably set an all core overclock that is higher than what the single-core turbo of that particular processor could hit but these processors 11th gen are the first of Intel CPUs where I’m really surprised at how low of an overclocking ceiling there actually is this is both because intel have been slowly walking up the boost clocks of their processors and making the boosting algorithm a lot smarter which is great that means better performance out of the box but also in this case the extra clock frequency just isn’t there in the rare chance that it is there with a lucky sample perhaps expect to use higher voltages which means more power and thermals and that really starts to get out of control but before we dive into the results let me recap my overclocking experience with the 10900k and 10600k which were overall really positive I have two 10900k samples on hand both can hit 5.2 gigahertz across all 10 cores and at a pretty reasonable load voltage as well 1.26 volts for one and just 1.225 volts for the other even 5.3 gigahertz at 1.32 volts was stable on that better sample as well in non-avx workloads then for the i5 10600 kf which was a retail sample overclocking results were a little bit lower but still very respectable for a more mainstream part where my particular sample topped out at 5.1 gigahertz at 1.31 volts.

Intel limited the Overclocking – 11600K & 11900K OC Intel limited the Overclocking – 11600K & 11900K OC Intel limited the Overclocking – 11600K & 11900K OC 

So what about this new generation then?

Well I happen to have again two i9 samples on hand where one is a little bit better than the other but both are a clear step back in terms of raw frequency from 10th gen the better sample of the two topped out at 5.1 gigahertz at 1.305 volts with the other requiring as much as 1.34
volts for that same frequency so this roughly looks about 200 megahertz behind what you could expect to hit on a 10900 k as for the i5 11600 k I couldn’t get five gigahertz fully stable on this chip at all which is really surprising that frequency required over 1.4 volts at full load CPU package temp was touching 95 degrees Celcius after a single run of cinebench and it wasn’t stable at all when it came to avx workloads like blender 4.9 gigahertz seems like the real ceiling for this particular 11600k sample and at that frequency, the chip needed 1.3 volts flat so what does this mean when it comes to thermals and power then? Well if you were expecting 11th gen to have any thermal or power benefits over 10th gen think again, in fact, these results actually look slightly worse core for core the 11900k sample that required 1.34 volts to hit 5.1 manages over 270 watts of power draw in blender and even with a 360 mil cooler running at 1500 rpm we still get some very toasty temperatures the better 11900k sample that I have on hand that required a little bit less voltage was a bit more manageable here but again considering the 10900k can hit higher frequencies at less voltage and power and with an additional two cores the 11900k isn’t looking so nice the 11600k overclock was a bit more tolerable here with package power and temperature looking okay at 4.9 gigahertz that’s fine and all that’s the single core turbo of this processor but it’s just weird to see the step back in frequency here versus the 10600k as for what this means for performance.

 

Well with these overclocking results, you’ll actually be lowering the single-threaded performance of the processor at best matching it seeing as the 11900k can naturally boost to 5.3 gigahertz on a single thread capping all cores to 4.1 means that there is a small performance penalty as for the 11600k which can turbo up to 4.9 on a single core we pretty much match that here without all core oc there are measurable benefits though when it comes to all core performance the 11600k gains a little over six percent and the eight-core i9 improves its performance by a very similar margin as for gaming there’s basically no performance improvement here to speak of at best you’re looking at about two percent improvement for the i5 but pretty much nothing 40 or high 9.

 

From ones perspective this is actually a good thing as amd and intel’s boosting algorithms become smarter you’re automatically taking advantage of more of what the processor has to offer out of the box personally I think that’s great but it’s clear that the overclocking ceiling here is quite a bit lower than what most would expect and i am aware that clocks aren’t everything and you can’t directly compare 11th gen to 10th gen scene as they are different architectures and the IPC on 11th gen is stronger at the end of the day but if you were expecting to milk 5.3 gigahertz out of an 11 900k or maybe 5.2 out of the i5 think again that’s especially considering that these results were with a pretty overkill test bench setup as well fitted with a z590 maximus 13 hero from asus a 360mm liquid cooler and a relatively low ambient room temperature so with more conventional pc setups and cooling anything above 1.3 volts for the i9 and 1.35 volts for the i5 is going to be very hard to manage under heavy use.

 

So where does that leave us then?

Well I think the appetite for a z590 motherboard and an unlocked intel 11cm processor has been heavily reduced after what you’ve just seen the potential just isn’t there and spending that extra money just really isn’t worth it for the very few of you who were considering going with 11th gen in the first place I would definitely steer you into the direction of going with something like a 11600F for example and then pairing that with a cheaper b560 motherboard and using those savings for a faster GPU or at least a faster memory kit.

 

That way you’ve got a much faster gaming rig at the end of the day and you won’t be kind of banging your head against the wall trying to squeeze five gigahertz out of an 11600k which probably isn’t even there to begin with.

Intel limited the Overclocking – 11600K & 11900K OC
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